Posts Tagged ‘kooaba’

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Google Goggles enters Advertising Image Recognition space

January 10, 2011

Just a few moments ago, Google announced the expected update for their image recognition playground app, called Goggles, for Android.

The new 1.3 version app now links existing print ads in major US newspapers and magazines back to August 2010 to not only their official campaign URL but also related web search results. This goes beyond the experiment announced back in November, when only a small range of print ads was Goggles-enabled and no web results were shown.

This is pretty significant as it shows how fast Google is able to move forward and claim a relatively new space where some highly specialized niche players were dominating the market. Services like Kooaba come to mind, which focuses on linking print media to online campaigns.

We are curious as always how this will evolve and if and when Google is going to extend this service internationally.

If you’re running Android go download Goggles from the Android Market and start experimenting.

A fair warning though if you love playing Sudoku, as this version of Goggles is a real spoiler of the game, see the video below and judge for yourself!

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Location based AR: the Third Generation

July 5, 2010

Mobile Augmented Reality on consumer devices is not even 2 years old and already at its 3rd generation regarding richness of its content model.

Apart from the very rapid technological improvements this has mostly to do with the creative innovators who adopted the new medium. These innovators constantly look for new ways to enhance the experience by adding new layers of depth and interaction models.

Mobile- or Location Based AR?

Mobile AR is an often used term to set this class of applications apart from the mostly static, marker based AR applications where a webcam attached to a computer is used to link a 3D model t a printed graphical marker. This type of application is certainly less mobile than the application class we call Mobile AR, but the main difference is that the latter uses the observer’s location as a unique trigger rather than visual recognition of a marker.

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